Evidence statements for consuming milk, yoghurt and cheese

The following evidence statements are sourced from the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines and are based on a review of the scientific evidence that outline consuming foods from the milk, yoghurt, cheese and/or alternatives (mostly reduced-fat) food group can support optimal health and prevent disease. The evidence statements underpinning recommendations for this food group are based on studies examining cow’s milk and products produced from cow’s milk (yoghurt and cheese). 

 Evidence statement
Grade
Consumption of at least two serves per day of dairy foods (milk, yoghurt, cheese) is associated with reduced risk of ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction.
B
Consumption of two or more serves of dairy foods per day is associated with reduced risk of stroke.
B
Consumption of three serves of low-fat dairy foods is associated with reduced risk of hypertension.
B
Consumption of more than one serve of dairy foods per day, especially milk, is associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer.
B
Consumption of three or more serves of milk per day is not associated with risk of renal cancer.
B
Consumption of three serves of any milk, yoghurt or cheese products a day is associated with reduced risk of hypertension.
C
Consumption of two to four serves of dairy foods per day is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.
C
Consumption of at least one-and-half serves of dairy foods (milk, yoghurt, cheese) per day is associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.
C
Consumption of more than one serve of milk per day is associated with reduced risk of rectal cancer.
C
Consumption of dairy products (particularly milk) is associated with improved bone mineral density.
C

Listen

In this audio clip, Dr Ryan Wallman, Head of Copy at Wellmark, talks about the health benefits of milk, yoghurt and cheese and discusses how most Australian adult women are not reaching their daily serves of dairy foods to help reduce health risks.